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Wednesday, April 7, 2010

Down By 11 Up By 1


This picture shows the remains of the herd, only 7 head.
Today I finally got a neighbour in with cattle trailer to sell some of the herd. I was up to 18 head which is the most cattle I have had on this farm in years. I knew the pasture was going to be hard pressed to keep them fed this summer even if it rains . And its been a dry spring so far, still feeding hay bales.
I hate loading cattle. I think its as stressful on me as it is on the cattle. Even the annoying complaining ones that I don't like, I feel a little guilty luring them into the shelter/penning area with oat chop and hay.
I'd planned to send 10 head but one extra old cow got in to the pen area so I decided to let her go if there was room on the trailer. I've kept back 7 head including a lame decrepit Bull that may or may not be able to perform his duties this summer. But he's been such a good quiet old bull all his life that I figure I will let him live out whatever days he has left on this farm. Same with that ten year old cow who is so quiet and never given me a moments trouble in all her life. Not to mention the many good calves she has produced.
Just before we started loading I noticed a 2 year old heifer looking like calving. She wandered off out into the pasture and I found her later with a new calf. So I am down by 11 and up by 1 today. Should be an easier summer

3 comments:

  1. I remember hating to part with cattle, too, but the money always came in handy. Congratulations on your first calf of the year! Some parts of farming I really miss; that's one of them. Stacking hay up next to the barn roof in August, however, is NOT a thing that I miss at all!

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  2. Raph, I just acquired a flat belt for that threshing machine. What was the saying, you bring the mountain to mohommad or mohommad to the mountain?
    Sometimes I miss cows but then I look at the fences and I get over it really quickly!

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  3. We got rid of our cattle in the late 70's when the fence-wire became more valuable than the cattle. Dad always planned to get more eventually, but he died unexpectedly in '84 without doing so.

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